"A hundred years from now, it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different because I was important in the life of a Child" ~ Anonymous


Lina from Sweden

I didn’t know what to expect, but like many other happenings in this amazing country it soon made me forget about any worries. As we arrived we were met by dozens of unfamiliar yet friendly faces and were offered sweets and food.

 

After being invited by one of the students to his uncle’s cremation, myself and three other Slukat volunteers arrived at his home feeling a mixture between excitement and nervousness. I didn’t know what to expect, but like many other happenings in this amazing country it soon made me forget about any worries. As we arrived we were met by dozens of unfamiliar yet friendly faces and were offered sweets and food. The compound where the ceremony’s first phase took place was covered with flowers and decorations in different colors and traditional Balinese music was played by a band sitting in the back. After a while we all went outside to watch as men carried a large bull made out of wood and paper down the street, followed by a portable altar half an hour later. We all walked down the street behind the altar (volunteers, family and friends of the deceased, neighbors and last but not least his students), through the village to get to the allocated spot for the burning of the body.

The body was placed in the wooden black bull and after a small ceremony they lit the fire. It felt weird not seeing too many crying faces, but it was explained to us that the man had lived a very good life and would therefore be reborn as something greater. The whole ceremony was nothing like the cremations or funerals of the western world, it reminded more of some sort of celebration (which I guess in a way it was).